OHCSNow in its 25th year, the Oxford Handbook of Clinical Specialties has been revised and updated by a trusted author team to bring you practical, up-to-date clinical advice and a unique outlook on the practice of medicine. Twelve books in one, this is the ultimate guide to the core clinical specialties for students, junior doctors, and specialists.

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With its companion volume, the Oxford Handbook of Clinical Medicine, the Oxford Handbook of Clinical Specialties offers a unique perspective on the practice of medicine. Filled with wit, wisdom, and humanity, this book draws on literature, history, and personal experience to teach a philosophy of medicine that always puts the patient at the centre of compassionate care. It is a trustworthy companion for anyone with the spirit of self-improvement and a passion for their practice.
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Arithmomania

arithmomaniaArithmomania is a mental disorder that may be seen as an expression of obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD). Individuals suffering from this disorder have a strong need to count their actions or objects in their surroundings.
Sufferers may for instance feel compelled to count the steps while ascending or descending a flight of stairs or to count the number of letters in words. They often feel it is necessary to perform an action a certain number of times to prevent alleged calamities. Other examples include counting tiles on the floor or ceiling, the number of lines on the highway, or simply the number of times one breathes or blinks.

The Cotard delusion (also Cotard’s Syndrome and Walking Corpse Syndrome) is a rare mental illness in which the afflicted person holds the delusion that he or she is dead, either figuratively or literally; yet said delusion of negation is not a symptom essential to the syndrome proper. Statistical analysis of a hundred-patient cohort indicates that the denial of self-existence is a symptom present in 69 percent of the cases of Cotard’s syndrome; yet, paradoxically, 55 percent of the patients might present delusions of immortality.

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Oculogyric crisis (OGC) is the name of a dystonic reaction to certain drugs or medical conditions characterized by a prolonged involuntary upward deviation of the eyes. The term “oculogyric” refers to rotating of eyeballs, but several other responses are associated with the crisis. Epilepsy can manifest as oculogyric seizures, also called versive seizures.

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broken heartTakotsubo cardiomyopathy, also known as transient apical ballooning syndrome, apical ballooning cardiomyopathy, stress-induced cardiomyopathy, Gebrochenes-Herz-Syndrom, and stress cardiomyopathy is a type of non-ischaemic cardiomyopathy in which there is a sudden temporary weakening of the myocardium. Because this weakening can be triggered by emotional stress, such as the death of a loved one, a break-up, or constant anxiety, it is also known as broken heart syndrome. Stress cardiomyopathy is a well-recognized cause of acute heart failure, lethal ventricular arrhythmias, and ventricular rupture.

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